Category: Lawson Trek

  • [Video] The Lawson Trek Comes to Cambridge, and Gets Snowed On

    Editor’s note: For The Lawson Trek, journalist and 2014-15 KSJ Project Fellow Scott Huler is retracing the journey of discovery undertaken by canoe and on foot in 1700-1701 by John Lawson, the first observer to carefully describe and catalogue the flora, fauna, geography and inhabitants of the Carolinas. The full story of Scott’s trek appears at his own Lawson Trek blog. Selected posts also appear on the Scientific American Expeditions blog and here at the KSJ blog. The video here is a personal record of Huler’s side trip to Cambridge last weekend—during the winter’s second big snowstorm—to participate in a Knight Science Journalism workshop on video animation. …

  • The Lawson Trek: Gimpy Old Men

    Editor’s note: For The Lawson Trek, journalist and 2014-15 KSJ Project Fellow Scott Huler is retracing the journey of discovery undertaken by canoe and on foot in 1700-1701 by John Lawson, the first observer to carefully describe and catalogue the flora, fauna, geography and inhabitants of the Carolinas. The full story of Scott’s trek appears at his own Lawson Trek blog. Selected posts also appear on the Scientific American Expeditions blog and here at the KSJ blog. To see all of Scott’s KSJ blog posts, click here.

    By the time the Lawson Trek finished its second segment it was one ecologist down; pal Katie Winsett had begun suffering enough knee pain that she peeled off at a nearby road, allowing Trek patron saint Kathie Livingston to send someone to pick her up. She continued helping and camping, but three walking days took it out of her.

    This third segment brought along not a young ecologist but Rob Waters, a friend and colleague who had time to come along because he’s retired. He and I walked together along roadways and on dirt paths through lovely old stands of live oaks and along fields some miles long.

  • The Lawson Trek: Hospitality

    Editor’s note: For The Lawson Trek, journalist Scott Huler is retracing the journey of discovery undertaken by canoe and on foot in 1700-1701 by John Lawson, the first observer to carefully describe and catalogue the flora, fauna, geography and inhabitants of the Carolinas. Posts from Scott’s trek are appearing at the Scientific American Expeditions blog, Scott’s own Lawson Trek blog, and here at the KSJ blog. For all the posts in the series, click here.

    We found shelter from a steady downpour beneath the overhang of the Shulerville used oil recycling center. Katie and I managed to exchanged soaked capilene for dryer materials from our packs without scandalizing any passersby, and then we waited for our new friend, Douglas Guerry, to drive by to pick us up.

  • The Lawson Trek: Regarding Journalism a Lot and Lawson Only a Little

    Editor’s note: For The Lawson Trek, journalist Scott Huler is retracing the journey of discovery undertaken by canoe and on foot in 1700-1701 by John Lawson, the first observer to carefully describe and catalogue the flora, fauna, geography and inhabitants of the Carolinas. Posts from Scott’s trek are appearing at the Scientific American Expeditions blog, Scott’s own Lawson Trek blog, and here at the KSJ blog. For all the posts in the series, click here.

    One of my undertakings on the Lawson Trek as a Knight Science Journalism Fellow at MIT is to think about more than just about Lawson and the scientific and cultural observations he made. I’m also trying out current journalistic tools and seeing how they compare to Lawson’s. I’m a science journalism fellow, not just a science fellow.