Tips and Tools for Reporting on COVID-19

The COVID-19 crisis is unfolding at a rapid pace, with new cases, new research, and new societal impacts materializing every day. To help reporters find clear, accurate information about the pandemic — and report on it responsibly — KSJ has compiled the following collection of resources and tools. We will be updating this page regularly.

MENU: REPORTING TIP SHEETS | FINDING RELIABLE DATA | FINDING PAPERS AND EXPERTS | FACT-CHECKING | VISUALIZING DATA | WHO TO FOLLOW

Reporting Tip Sheets

  • Covering Coronavirus: Resources for Journalists” (Columbia University’s Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma). This list of trauma reporting resources has an emphasis on COVID-19, and includes resources in both English and Chinese.
  • Covering the coronavirus outbreak” (The Committee to Protect Journalists). Compiled by an international nonprofit, the resource page provides advice on how to stay safe while reporting on the COVID-19 pandemic, including pointers on planning travel and avoiding infection.
  • How journalists can fight stress from covering the coronavirus” (Poynter). This guide includes a video by Journalist Al Tompkins and psychotherapist Sidney Tompkins on how to manage the stress of reporting on coronavirus.
  • Covering COVID-19 Media Briefing,” SciLine. A web panel on best practices for reporting on the pandemic, featuring guests Georges Benjamin of the American Public Health Association, Caroline Chen of ProPublica, and Laura Helmuth of the Washington Post.
  • Coronaviruses: Background and sources for your reporting,” Association of Health Care Journalists. A compilation of tips and resources for journalists thrown into covering the coronavirus.

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Finding Reliable Data

  • Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center. Maintained at Johns Hopkins’ Center for Systems Science and Engineering, the site uses data from the World Health Organization, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the European Center for Disease Prevention, and other sources around the world to track and visualize cases of Covid-19. The platform includes a Covid-19 Map and an alternative data visualization of the data behind the map.
  • The World Health Organization’s Covid-19 Dashboard and daily Situation Report.
  • Worldometer’s Covid-19 Coronavirus Outbreak page. Run by an international team of developers, researchers, and volunteers, the page draws from sources including the World Health Organization and presents infections statistics broken down by country, age, and other categories.
  • The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Cases & Latest Updates page. The page includes at-a-glance statistics on U.S. cases, as well as information about testing and the U.S. government’s response.
  • The University of Virginia’s Covid-19 Surveillance Dashboard. Prepared by a division of the University’s Biocomplexity Institute and Initiative, the visualization tool includes county-level statistics for the U.S. and state/province level statistics for Canada, Chile, India, and Germany.
  • The New York Times’ coronavirus map. Sourced from state and local health agencies, hospitals, and C.D.C. data, the map shows confirmed cases in the U.S by county.
  • The COVID Tracking Project. Started by two Atlantic journalists and the founder of the biotech firm Related Sciences, the COVID Tracking Project collects information from U.S. states, territories, and the District of Columbia to provide comprehensive coronavirus testing data.
  • The University of Minnesota’s Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Resource Center. The site offers a range of Covid-19 information, curated by the University’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy.

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Finding Papers and Experts

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Fact-Checking

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Visualizing Data

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Who to Follow

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