Skip to Content

Category: national geographic

Something must be slightly amiss in the journalistic universe: National Geographic's October issue is--be sure you're sitting down for this one--a photo issue!

This shook me to the core. If the October issue is...

Something must be slightly amiss in the journalistic universe: National Geographic's October issue is--be sure you're sitting down for this one--a photo issue!

This shook me to the core. If the October issue is a photo issue, what have all those other issues been?

The photo issue celebrates the 125th anniversary of the Geographic, and it includes odd facts such as this: The magazine published 1,468 photos in 2012. They were culled from a staggering 2 million that were taken in that single year. (See what I mean about calling this a special photo issue?)

Among the photographs that made the cut for this issue, you will see chilling images of child soldiers in the Eastern Congo, terraced fields in Borneo that are scarring the landscape, the astonishing retreat of the Columbia Glacier in Columbia Bay, Alaska, and a series of dramatic head shots that...

Long-time USA Today science writer Dan Vergano has been snatched away by NationalGeographic.com, which has been moving to expand its daily science news coverage with a series of new hires.

We'll forgive the folks at National Geographic...

Long-time USA Today science writer Dan Vergano has been snatched away by NationalGeographic.com, which has been moving to expand its daily science news coverage with a series of new hires.

We'll forgive the folks at National Geographic for saying in their press release that they are "making a bigger play in the digital space." We know what they mean, and we're glad they don't use that jargon in their stories.

Vergano, a 2008 Nieman Fellow at Harvard who has spent 14 years at USA Today, is a very good reporter, and he has proven himself a tough debater in thoughtful exchanges here in the comments section of the Tracker.

It's encouraging to see National Geographic expanding its digital coverage. If it can bring to the web the editorial excellence it has demonstrated in print, it...

[Updates with addition of some authors' names, links, and mention of article in Outside magazine.]

National Geographic led the list of National...

[Updates with addition of some authors' names, links, and mention of article in Outside magazine.]

National Geographic led the list of National Magazine Award finalists with seven nominations, the American Society of Magazine Editors announced today. Wired received three nominations and Scientific American was awarded two. 

That put science journalism in a leading position among the 62 finalists in 23 categories. (The language is a bit confusing. "Finalists" are the nominees among which a winner will be chosen in each category at a dinner in New York on May 2.)

National Geographic received its honors in the categories of general excellence in print and digital media, and...

Curtis Brainard at the Columbia Journalism Review's The Observatory has talked to Discover magazine for a reaction...

Curtis Brainard at the Columbia Journalism Review's The Observatory has talked to Discover magazine for a reaction to the recent blogger exodus that Deborah Blum covered here at the Tracker.

A week ago, news broke that  Ed Yong (his blog is Not Exactly Rocket Science) and Carl Zimmer (The Loom) were leaving Discover for National Geographic's new Phenomena blogging collective to be run by National Geographic science editor Jamie ShreevePhil Plait (Bad Astronomy)...

National Geographic announced today that it will be launching a new science blog network, titled Phenomena, featuring four high-octane science bloggers  - Virginia Hughes (Only Human), Brian Switek (Laelaps), Ed Yong (Not...

National Geographic announced today that it will be launching a new science blog network, titled Phenomena, featuring four high-octane science bloggers  - Virginia Hughes (Only Human), Brian Switek (Laelaps), Ed Yong (Not Exactly Rocket Science) and Carl Zimmer (The Loom).

The new network, assembled by the magazine's executive editor for science, Jamie Shreeve, is scheduled to debut on Tuesday, December 18.  It represents National Geographic's first serious move into the increasingly high-profile world of science blogging. (Although National Geographic acquired the old Scienceblogs network in 2011, it never showed any real enthusiasm for it).

But thanks to the quality of its debut bloggers, this new network, although small,  represents a...

The other day I was watching CBS Sunday Morning with my (almost) five-year-old, delighted that he was willing to click away from Cartoon Network for a few minutes to watch the news. We hadn't been watching five minutes when Charles Osgood introduced a segment on pole dancing. I dove for the clicker as we watched a...

The other day I was watching CBS Sunday Morning with my (almost) five-year-old, delighted that he was willing to click away from Cartoon Network for a few minutes to watch the news. We hadn't been watching five minutes when Charles Osgood introduced a segment on pole dancing. I dove for the clicker as we watched a sinewy blonde corkscrew down a silver pole for several agonizing seconds before the cable box lurched back to Quick Draw McGraw. Henry didn't ask what that was, or why I'd changed the channel. And I didn't volunteer an explanation.

We've had similar experiences while watching the Science Channel's How It's Made, one of Henry's favorite shows. (Henry knows what's at the center of a bowling ball. Do you?) Interesting shows about the manufacture of...

Ivan Oransky...

Ivan Oransky broke the story at Retraction Watch, and now National Geographic confirms it.

National Geographic "has assumed management of day-to-day operations for Scienceblogs.com, expanding a relationship with Seed Media Group that started when National Geographic took on ad sales responsibility for Scienceblogs.com in 2009."

ScienceBlogs...