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Category: multiverse

   While looking for something else the eyes fell upon a gem that reminds one that, for all the work most science journalists put into turning science- and math-talk into plain language, not too many including me very often take dives deep enough to bring a twinge of comprehension, a near-sharing of the...

   While looking for something else the eyes fell upon a gem that reminds one that, for all the work most science journalists put into turning science- and math-talk into plain language, not too many including me very often take dives deep enough to bring a twinge of comprehension, a near-sharing of the exhiliration felt by top notch scientists noodling at the rim of the noosphere. Especially in theoretical - maybe I should say hypothetical - physics.

   Here are two recent numbers from a man - and old pal - who does it all the time much to the amusement and occasional befuddlement of colleagues:

The New Year's offering yesterday from Natalie Angier at The New York Times tripped me up at the lede:

On this day that fetishizes finitude, that reminds us how rapidly our own earthly time share is shrinking, allow me to offer the modest...

The New Year's offering yesterday from Natalie Angier at The New York Times tripped me up at the lede:

On this day that fetishizes finitude, that reminds us how rapidly our own earthly time share is shrinking, allow me to offer the modest comfort of infinities.

I'm not sure which day she's talking about, Dec. 31 or Jan. 1. And I'm not sure infinities will expand our time share. But from there on, she delivers a delightful piece on current thinking about infinities--not one, but many.

"in the ever-evolving view of scientists, philosophers and other scholars, there really is no single, implacable entity called infinity," she writes. Instead, they "come in a vast variety of shapes, sizes, purposes and charms," including such monsters as...

Has science just discovered that the...

Has science just discovered that the multiverse is us? That our very own universe is not only one of many, but it connects directly to other ones with very different physical laws and we can sense the borderlands via a tiny gradient in the visible cosmos?  It depends - but over the last week a trickle of stories has spread news that an arcane, but quite vital and mysterious, pillar of physics may work differently in other places with a variation that itself varies by what direction one looks. Thus the fine structure constant that is the protagonist in this tale, aka alpha in equations in physics, may be a variable.

Avid followers of physics news, as well as just about every serious physicist, know that...