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Category: medical ethics

It’s easy enough to dismiss an unpopular claim, but harder to really question it. Before the 2012 elections, for example, abortion opponents started touting scientific evidence that women rarely got pregnant from rape. There was no shortage of commentary that followed – most of it critical and...

It’s easy enough to dismiss an unpopular claim, but harder to really question it. Before the 2012 elections, for example, abortion opponents started touting scientific evidence that women rarely got pregnant from rape. There was no shortage of commentary that followed – most of it critical and dismissive. Emily Bazelon went a step further and questioned whether abortion foes were referring to specific studies, and if so, who did these studies and why.

What she found took her down a twisted path through the harrowing world of Nazi science. The latest chapter in her investigations came out last week in a Slate piece headlined, The Nazi Anatomists. Here’s the second graph, about a young medical student named Charlotte Pommer and her boss, anatomist Herman Stieve:  

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It's always nice to see one of those pop-up messages that says a friend of yours has endorsed you on LinkedIn--for blogging, or editing, or journalism. One might trumpet one's own expertise, but plaudits from others carry more weight.

Pharmaceutical companies have evidently found that to be true as...

It's always nice to see one of those pop-up messages that says a friend of yours has endorsed you on LinkedIn--for blogging, or editing, or journalism. One might trumpet one's own expertise, but plaudits from others carry more weight.

Pharmaceutical companies have evidently found that to be true as well, because they have shown a fondness for getting outside experts to endorse their products. Sometimes they do it by writing articles extolling their products and persuading--or paying--an outside expert to sign on as the author. As the Forest Pharmaceuticals marketing plan for Lexapro put it, “Bylined articles will allow us to fold Lexapro’s message into articles about depression, anxiety, and comorbidity.”

That comes from a three-part series on medical-journal ghostwriting at ...

Much has been said recently about the possibility of cloning a Neanderthal, now that the Neanderthal's genome has been sequenced. Mistaken reports in recent days claimed that a Harvard researcher, George Church, was searching for an adventurous woman to become the surrogate mother of a Neanderthal baby. Those...

Much has been said recently about the possibility of cloning a Neanderthal, now that the Neanderthal's genome has been sequenced. Mistaken reports in recent days claimed that a Harvard researcher, George Church, was searching for an adventurous woman to become the surrogate mother of a Neanderthal baby. Those stories were debunked by a number of science reporters, including Faye Flam here on the Tracker.

Tabitha M. Powledge, who likes to find a theme for each weekly edition of her On Science Blogs, wrapped last Friday's post around Neanderthals and Denisovans, the more recently discovered relatives of Homo sapiens. While praising science bloggers generally for correcting the misleading stories about George Church, she expresses some...

[Barbara Feder Ostrov, a former medical reporter for the San Jose Mercury News, wrote...

[Barbara Feder Ostrov, a former medical reporter for the San Jose Mercury News, wrote the following for ReportingonHealth.org, a project of the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism. Ostrov is now deputy editor but leaves this week for a job at the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health.]

 

Investigative reporter Marjie Lundstrom's medical ethics scoop this fall was a jaw-dropper: two University of...