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Category: Jenny Craig

The article in the New England Journal of Medicine caught my eye immediately, even before I'd read any of the coverage. "Myths, Presumptions, and Facts about Obesity," was what it said, and I quickly clipped it and...

The article in the New England Journal of Medicine caught my eye immediately, even before I'd read any of the coverage. "Myths, Presumptions, and Facts about Obesity," was what it said, and I quickly clipped it and saved it. With all the recent controversy among science journalists over what does or what doesn't work regarding weight loss, this seemed like the answer to a prayer--a summary of the evidence on key points, and published in the reputable New England Journal.

Marilynn Marchione at The AP wrote it up this way:

Fact or fiction? Sex burns a...

In a 4,000-word cover story in the Jan./Feb. 2013 issue of the Columbia Journalism ReviewDavid H. Freedman, a contributing editor at The Atlantic, offers us a...

In a 4,000-word cover story in the Jan./Feb. 2013 issue of the Columbia Journalism ReviewDavid H. Freedman, a contributing editor at The Atlantic, offers us a comprehensive critique of what he calls "personal-health journalism"--what most of us would call medical writing. "Personal-health journalists have fallen into a trap," he writes, producing stories that "grossly mislead the public, often in ways that can lead to poor health decisions with catastrophic consequences."

The problem is not "the sloppiness of poorly trained science writers looking for sensational headlines," he writes. "Many of these articles were written by celebrated health-science journalists and published in respected magazines and newspapers; their arguments were backed up with what appears to be solid,...

The New York City Health Department is poised today to approve Mayor Michael Bloomberg's proposed ban on sodas larger than 16 ounces. That has generated another round of reporting which, I hoped, might discuss the available evidence for whether such a ban would help reduce obesity.

Alan Mozes...

The New York City Health Department is poised today to approve Mayor Michael Bloomberg's proposed ban on sodas larger than 16 ounces. That has generated another round of reporting which, I hoped, might discuss the available evidence for whether such a ban would help reduce obesity.

Alan Mozes at HealthDay takes time to ask the question, interviewing two researchers and reporting that the American Academy of Pediatrics, a Harvard obesity expert (Walter Willett), Weight Watchers, and Jenny Craig, among others, support the ban. But he doesn't explain why they support it or think it would be effective. 

The AP's David B. Caruso explains that the ban would give...