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Category: hurricane sandy

On Sunday, The New York Times published a disturbing investigation into the story behind a recommendation by city officials that "thousands of elderly,...

On Sunday, The New York Times published a disturbing investigation into the story behind a recommendation by city officials that "thousands of elderly, disabled and mentally ill residents remain in more than 40 nursing homes and adult homes in flood-prone areas of New York City" in the days and hours before the arrival of Hurricane Sandy. The decision, the Times reports, had "calamitous consequences." (The story appears today, Dec. 3, in the print edition.)

The story's authors, Jennifer Preston, Sheri Fink, and Michael Powell, report that "it took at least three days for the Fire Department, the National Guard and ambulance crews from around the country to rescue over 4,000 nursing home and 1,500 adult home residents. Without working...

The business press has not been among the leaders in writing and thinking about climate change and the consequences for the economy. 

This week, Bloomberg Businessweek begins to rewrite that script with a slashing story on climate change and...

The business press has not been among the leaders in writing and thinking about climate change and the consequences for the economy. 

This week, Bloomberg Businessweek begins to rewrite that script with a slashing story on climate change and a dramatic cover that is an instant classic:

It's a strong story, and well worth reading. But the cover is what people will remember--and it's what might prod business people into a more open-minded attitude toward climate change and its consequences. 

Josh Tyrangiel, Businessweek's editor, tweeted, "Our cover story this week may generate controversy, but only among the stupid....

On this week's Science BlogsTabitha M. Powledge fills a basket with important links related to climate and Sandy. Her selection is especially valuable if you were among those of us who didn't have power to read these things when they were posted.

She...

On this week's Science BlogsTabitha M. Powledge fills a basket with important links related to climate and Sandy. Her selection is especially valuable if you were among those of us who didn't have power to read these things when they were posted.

She also notes that a few other things happened last week, including news on the politics of health care, the election and Jonah Lehrer. Remember Jonah Lehrer?

Find it all here.

-Paul Raeburn

 

Paul Raeburn
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Editor's Note: All is well at the Raeburn household in lower Manhattan following Sandy, but we've been without power, Internet, and water since Monday night. We're still unsure when any of these necessities of life might return. Meanwhile, I'm clawing my way online at a coffee shop in midtown to...

Editor's Note: All is well at the Raeburn household in lower Manhattan following Sandy, but we've been without power, Internet, and water since Monday night. We're still unsure when any of these necessities of life might return. Meanwhile, I'm clawing my way online at a coffee shop in midtown to write this note. You probably have not noticed any disruption in service, as they say, thanks to the fine work of trackers Deb Blum and Faye Flam. I hope to rejoin them soon.

-Paul Raeburn

In comments Tuesday, while discussing the high-powered destruction wrought by Hurricane Sandy, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo went into territory mostly avoided by U.S. politicians these days. To quote: "There has been a...

In comments Tuesday, while discussing the high-powered destruction wrought by Hurricane Sandy, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo went into territory mostly avoided by U.S. politicians these days. To quote: "There has been a series of extreme weather incidents. That is not a political statement, that is a factual statement ... Anyone who says there's not a dramatic change in weather patterns, I think is denying reality."

Okay, he said "dramatic change" rather than "climate change" but there's no missing the point. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg raised the possibility a little more directly: "the storms we've experienced in the last year or so around this country and around the world are much more severe than before. Whether...

On Saturday, Linda Holmes of NPR's monkeysee blog watched 14 hours of The Weather Channel. Why oh why? she laments. Why did I do it?...

On Saturday, Linda Holmes of NPR's monkeysee blog watched 14 hours of The Weather Channel. Why oh why? she laments. Why did I do it?

She isn't sure, but her hilarious introspection on that lost day had me howling louder than the winds of Hurricane Sandy (which are swirling around my apartment as I write). One reason, she writes, is that "the darkest and guiltiest part of your soul is waiting to see a wipeout. Not a dangerous wipeout; you don't want the weather guy to get hurt. But blown over harmlessly so that his windbreaker comes partially unsnapped? Well, yes."

Holmes bares her dark, hurricane-addled soul before us, and by the time we...