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Category: HOrned dinosaurs

One might almost think from some accounts within a spate of small news items the last few days that paleontologists had found a UFO with unearthly bones in it. The news is in a report by a Canadian-born researcher, now at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, who published with colleagues a report in the ...

One might almost think from some accounts within a spate of small news items the last few days that paleontologists had found a UFO with unearthly bones in it. The news is in a report by a Canadian-born researcher, now at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, who published with colleagues a report in the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. They described analysis of  the oldest large ceratopsian known from Canada, one whose bones had been stored away in an Ottawa museum, unappreciated, for half a century. It is deeper on the ancestral tree than famous Triceratops, has about the same face and parrot-like beak, a big neck frill, and even more horns.

    But reading some of the accounts makes one wonder. How many reporters did any research into this family? I don't mean deep research. I mean any. A few of these stories make it seem that its goofy big head is something unlike any of its family ever seen. The press release (see Grist) may...

It's been way too long - weeks maybe - since a dinosuar was in the news. High time. Maybe some day some paleontologists will find a new dinosaur with some sort of way to distinguish it from other dinos, and it won't make the news. That will be the end of the world as we know it. These beasts are evergreen.

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It's been way too long - weeks maybe - since a dinosuar was in the news. High time. Maybe some day some paleontologists will find a new dinosaur with some sort of way to distinguish it from other dinos, and it won't make the news. That will be the end of the world as we know it. These beasts are evergreen.

This time it is a two-fer from one journal.

   First up, a fringed, horned dinosaur of the general sort as famed triceratops whose bones have been in human custody for nearly 100 years. That makes for good story telling. They were dug from the ground in southern Alberta, a time of frenzied dinosaur foraging. They and the stones encasing them were so scrappy...