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Category: glaxosmithkline

It's always nice to see one of those pop-up messages that says a friend of yours has endorsed you on LinkedIn--for blogging, or editing, or journalism. One might trumpet one's own expertise, but plaudits from others carry more weight.

Pharmaceutical companies have evidently found that to be true as...

It's always nice to see one of those pop-up messages that says a friend of yours has endorsed you on LinkedIn--for blogging, or editing, or journalism. One might trumpet one's own expertise, but plaudits from others carry more weight.

Pharmaceutical companies have evidently found that to be true as well, because they have shown a fondness for getting outside experts to endorse their products. Sometimes they do it by writing articles extolling their products and persuading--or paying--an outside expert to sign on as the author. As the Forest Pharmaceuticals marketing plan for Lexapro put it, “Bylined articles will allow us to fold Lexapro’s message into articles about depression, anxiety, and comorbidity.”

That comes from a three-part series on medical-journal ghostwriting at ...

A review of "transcripts of FDA hearings, financial disclosures, medical journal articles, and a U.S. Department of Justice complaint against GlaxoSmithKline" led John Fauber of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel to report that the asthma drug Advair and similar...

A review of "transcripts of FDA hearings, financial disclosures, medical journal articles, and a U.S. Department of Justice complaint against GlaxoSmithKline" led John Fauber of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel to report that the asthma drug Advair and similar drugs were linked to 1,900 asthma deaths from 2004-2011, according to one estimate.

And this:

A Journal Sentinel/MedPage Today investigation found the growth in Advair sales followed new asthma treatment recommendations that were written largely by doctors who received money from GlaxoSmithKline and other companies that market the drugs.

Fauber's story was written for the Journal Sentinel in collaboration with MedPage Today, which also...

Let's face it, primary care doctors don't know much about treating psychiatric disorders. If...

Let's face it, primary care doctors don't know much about treating psychiatric disorders. If they were lucky, they had one, brief clinical rotation through psychiatry during medical school, and even if they did, they didn't learn much, and they've long since forgotten it.

Yet with the acute shortage of psychiatrists in this country, primary care doctors are treating many, many cases of depression, anxiety, and other serious psychiatric ailments. So where do they turn for help? Among other sources, to reference books written by the pros--working psychiatrists.

The chairman of the psychiatry department at Emory University would seem like a reliable source. Especially if he were a widely recognized researcher who had been honored with a long string of...