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   Yesterday morning Harvard University released a press release about as breathless as that patrician school's news offices get. It passed my eyes as I was scanning through the NSF's science360 press release and news aggregation service,...

   Yesterday morning Harvard University released a press release about as breathless as that patrician school's news offices get. It passed my eyes as I was scanning through the NSF's science360 press release and news aggregation service, yesterday morning.  It features the b-word that rhymes with make-do and which is normally verboten at respectable publications unless referring to something that history has already demonstratably shown to merit the accolade or that is something we need but haven't yet got. Normally I'd put this handout at the bottom of a post in the bin I call Grist for the Mill. But this one is not only dramatic, it reads convincingly enough to make one think...maybe. So it leads off:

  • Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences press release:...

  A flawed but nonetheless impressive and detailed report just out from a substantial if techie news outlet prompts the thought: what is it about chemistry that turns off so many reporters? Why don't science journalists more often take chemistry and chemical engineering stories to a deep enough level to...

  A flawed but nonetheless impressive and detailed report just out from a substantial if techie news outlet prompts the thought: what is it about chemistry that turns off so many reporters? Why don't science journalists more often take chemistry and chemical engineering stories to a deep enough level to give readers a sense of what the atoms and molecules in today's incredible industrial complex are doing with one another? Here's the yarn:

  The topic has gotten sporadic interest over the last decade or two from large, general-interest dailies and other news agencies. It is the idea that if only we could stuff  CO2 back deep in the ground whence its...