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Category: fertility

Two weeks ago, I criticized The Atlantic for a story entitled "How junk food can end obesity." To summarize my comments: It can't. And the article doesn't say it can.

But the same issue of the magazine has an article by Jean Twenge that...

Two weeks ago, I criticized The Atlantic for a story entitled "How junk food can end obesity." To summarize my comments: It can't. And the article doesn't say it can.

But the same issue of the magazine has an article by Jean Twenge that takes a careful look at the statistics on declining fertility in women in their 30s and 40s and finds that it doesn't decline as much as everyone thinks: There's no justification for baby panic.

Twenge combines memoir and reflection with a cold assessment of the statistics. When she was 30 and extricating herself from her first marriage, "I seemed destined to remain childless until at least my mid-30s, and perhaps always," she writes.

She finds little scientific justification for the frightening stats on fertility decline, and locates studies that paint...

In a short essay at rhrealitycheck.org, Elizabeth Gregory, the director of Women's Gender & Sexuality...

In a short essay at rhrealitycheck.org, Elizabeth Gregory, the director of Women's Gender & Sexuality Studies at the University of Houston, argues that new research linking older fathers to an increased risk of autism, schizophrenia, and other ailments in their children, is "not the end of the world." That's from the headline, and maybe she didn't write it. But it's vague. And if it means we shouldn't be too concerned about the risks of older fatherhood, it's premature.

Rhrealitycheck.org, which I'm not familiar with, says it is "an online community and publication serving individuals and organizations committed to advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights," and a "resource for evidence-based information,...

sperm

Genetic engineers, as we quaintly used to call people who tinker with genes, have crossed another scientific-ethical line. According to a...

sperm

Genetic engineers, as we quaintly used to call people who tinker with genes, have crossed another scientific-ethical line. According to a study in Nature, Stanford researchers have used stem cells to produce the precursors of human sperm and eggs.

Rob Waters of Bloomberg is quick--perhaps a little too quick--to tell us what this means: "Stem cells were changed to form the precursors of sperm and eggs in a research advance that may lead to better ways of treating the infertility affecting 10 to 15 percent of would-be parents in the U.S."

That's a lot to pack into one sentence, even if it is a short, quick one. He repeats the accomplishment in the second graf, and...