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Category: Extreme weather

The business press has not been among the leaders in writing and thinking about climate change and the consequences for the economy. 

This week, Bloomberg Businessweek begins to rewrite that script with a slashing story on climate change and...

The business press has not been among the leaders in writing and thinking about climate change and the consequences for the economy. 

This week, Bloomberg Businessweek begins to rewrite that script with a slashing story on climate change and a dramatic cover that is an instant classic:

It's a strong story, and well worth reading. But the cover is what people will remember--and it's what might prod business people into a more open-minded attitude toward climate change and its consequences. 

Josh Tyrangiel, Businessweek's editor, tweeted, "Our cover story this week may generate controversy, but only among the stupid....

Yes, we done it. At least, some...

Yes, we done it. At least, some of it. Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, UK's Met Office, and elsewhere have a package of reports in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Association that, news reports say, add up to a nos culpa, which means I think same as a collective mea culpa. The package includes NOAA's annual report on such things, this edition being the State of the Climate 2011. Some droughts, storm onslaughts and other weather strangeness can be attributed, via one or two sigmas worth of confidence,  to the cumulative effects of greenhouse gases and other human forcings on climate.

This is getting considerable attention even in a media world that is...

Weather Underground

The causation confusion cycle has played out again as it will many more times in US and to an extent international media over the last week. Whether it's a hurricane hitting Florida or New Orleans or Maryland, failing oyster farms in Oregon to British Columbia, absurd drought in Texas and Oklahoma, or tornadoes spewing record numbers of trailer parts to kingdom come, media entertain The question. Is this global warming? Usually, it gets...

Charlie Petit
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Two news services say they have...

Two news services say they have obtained drafts of a report, on weather extremes, from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change due out officially in a few weeks. Or, if not the whole report, the 20-page summary.

  • AP - Seth Borenstein: Panel says wild weather worsens ;Filed from DC with the overline "APNewsbreak," a sign the service regards this as an excloo. The money line up high: "..the report paints a wild future for a world already weary of weather catastrophes costing billions of dollars. The report says costs will rise and perhaps some locations will become "...

This isn't so much science journalism as a...

This isn't so much science journalism as a broadcast that almost anybody who enjoys news of science will also find absorbing, and disturbing. A happenstance decision to check what MPR has on its midmorning broadcast found a gem. Put it on your ipod, or just listen. The host - Kerri Miller? I think so -  talks with Wade Goodwin about the fires in Texas. "Apocalypse..the trees are like matchsticks ... the pine trees are exploding...

Yesterday I...

Yesterday I posted on a BBC story that provided links to some of the source material, including long reports, that went into the writing of it. Today, another good example comes along. To be sure, since the web began some news stories on line have including hyperlinks to supporting information. But is it a growing practice at major outlets? Seems so. Can't be sure. Welcome if so.

Here is another such buttressed piece from a major news outlet:

  • AP - Seth Borenstein:...