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Category: exercise

In a 4,000-word cover story in the Jan./Feb. 2013 issue of the Columbia Journalism ReviewDavid H. Freedman, a contributing editor at The Atlantic, offers us a...

In a 4,000-word cover story in the Jan./Feb. 2013 issue of the Columbia Journalism ReviewDavid H. Freedman, a contributing editor at The Atlantic, offers us a comprehensive critique of what he calls "personal-health journalism"--what most of us would call medical writing. "Personal-health journalists have fallen into a trap," he writes, producing stories that "grossly mislead the public, often in ways that can lead to poor health decisions with catastrophic consequences."

The problem is not "the sloppiness of poorly trained science writers looking for sensational headlines," he writes. "Many of these articles were written by celebrated health-science journalists and published in respected magazines and newspapers; their arguments were backed up with what appears to be solid,...

For reasons that defy explanation, The New York Times has had a troubled relationship with yoga. I've noted the Times obsession and confusion in these pages, as well as...

For reasons that defy explanation, The New York Times has had a troubled relationship with yoga. I've noted the Times obsession and confusion in these pages, as well as the spectacle of five separate yoga stories appearing in one week during July, 2010.

The Times seemed confused about whether yoga was a fashion, a kind of exercise, a form of meditation, or a trend. Last Sunday, the Times, through sheer determination, I suppose, finally overcame its yoga confusion.

Writing in the Sunday Review in last weekend's Times, William J. Broad, a science writer, does a straight news story on why men are more likely to be injured while...

Here's what can happen when a reporter decides to be completely honest about the limitations and problems inherent in good medical writing.

Larry Husten, a respected medical writer who specializes in coverage of cardiology,...

Here's what can happen when a reporter decides to be completely honest about the limitations and problems inherent in good medical writing.

Larry Husten, a respected medical writer who specializes in coverage of cardiology, wrote a post for Forbes yesterday that began like this:

Last week I wrote twice about exercise. Strictly speaking, both stories were complete lies.

That took my breath away. Should we lock this guy up? What exactly is he talking about?

Actually, Husten is making a strong pitch for better coverage of studies that don't quite say what they seem to say.

The first case in point: A study that found that certain drugs and exercise "are independently associated with low mortality" in individuals with abnormal cholesterol. The researchers concluded...

At the Well blog at The New York TimesGretchen Reynolds has a post on a Danish study that found that men who...

At the Well blog at The New York TimesGretchen Reynolds has a post on a Danish study that found that men who exercised 30 minutes a day lost more weight than those who exercised 60 minutes.

Before you decide not to do that Ironman, you might want to look at the considerable limitations of the study. The study lasted only 13 weeks, and although Reynolds doesn't say so, it involved only about 60 young men--about 20 each in the no-exercise, moderate-exercise, and high-exercise groups. And the men kept diaries of what they'd eaten--a way to track calories that is not entirely reliable.

Reynolds might have been more careful to note the study's small size and other limitations, but she concludes with a universal truth: the relationship between exercise and weight...

I've written here before about the curious case of yoga and The New York Times. The Times...

I've written here before about the curious case of yoga and The New York Times. The Times often seems both obsessed and confused about yoga, as I wrote in 2010 when the Times published five stories on yoga in one week.

Now the Times weighs in, in this week's upcoming Sunday magazine, with a piece by veteran Times science writer William J. Broad entitled, "How Yoga Can Wreck Your Body." If you suspect that this story might not...

The coverage of yoga by The New York Times this week has been nothing if not...

The coverage of yoga by The New York Times this week has been nothing if not comprehensive. As I wrote earlier this week, the Times had three stories on yoga in last Sunday's paper. It had another yesterday, and yet another today--five stories this week on yoga!

My earlier post noted that all three Sunday stories treated yoga flippantly or negatively, leading me to wonder why the Times seemed so frightened of yoga--or, at best, uninformed.

I'm happy to say that the two most recent stories are quite different. Yesterday, Sam Dolnick...