Skip to Content

Category: Daily Mail

Last week, I wrote about the nifty practice of the UK's Daily Mail of covering science by taking others' stories and scratching out a light rewrite.

The paper seems to think it's permissible...

Last week, I wrote about the nifty practice of the UK's Daily Mail of covering science by taking others' stories and scratching out a light rewrite.

The paper seems to think it's permissible to expropriate ideas, story structure, art, and tone from others, as long as it doesn't use the same language. No plagiarism here, the Daily Mail can shout! It makes no effort to cover its tracks; it even links to the stories it's reusing. The Mail is apparently proud of this.

Sadly for the Mail, stealing people's ideas and story execution is as execrable as stealing their words. By avoiding the exact language of the stories it uses, the Mail is simply exploiting a loophole.

Sometimes, the Mail doesn't even work very hard to avoid the same language. This is from...

The UK's Daily Mail has found a nifty way to cover science: Simply use other people's stories.

Case in point: On Aug. 6, the science blogger and author Brian Switek, whose obsession with dinosaurs rivals Wile E. Coyote's with The Road Runner, wrote...

The UK's Daily Mail has found a nifty way to cover science: Simply use other people's stories.

Case in point: On Aug. 6, the science blogger and author Brian Switek, whose obsession with dinosaurs rivals Wile E. Coyote's with The Road Runner, wrote a delightful piece for Smithsonian.com entitled, "The Top Ten Weirdest Dinosaur Extinction Ideas," including such things as "extra-terrestrials eliminated the dinosaurs to make room for humanity," and the idea that caterpillars wiped them out by eating all the vegetation, leaving herbivores with "nothing to eat but each other."

On Aug. 8, the Daily Mail ran a not-quite-as-delightful...

  Any newspaper can do something that really ticks off anybody who has a set of hackles to raise. A Brooklyn-based blogger, press critic, and climate change news specialist has a tidy tantrum out today aimed at two newspapers at near-opposite ends of the spectrum of old-time UK media. His ire has merit and...

  Any newspaper can do something that really ticks off anybody who has a set of hackles to raise. A Brooklyn-based blogger, press critic, and climate change news specialist has a tidy tantrum out today aimed at two newspapers at near-opposite ends of the spectrum of old-time UK media. His ire has merit and deserves a wide audience:

   There's not much to add from this end, as it'd just be to say huzzah and go get'em Keith. His targets are an example of "crazy-ass reporting on climate change"  at the Daily Mail...

What reader could resist clicking on a headline about a mad scientist trying to find women to carry Neanderthal clones? It sounds like something from the old supermarket tabloid the Weekly World News, but this latest whopper is loosely based on a real statement by a real scientist.

In his book,...

What reader could resist clicking on a headline about a mad scientist trying to find women to carry Neanderthal clones? It sounds like something from the old supermarket tabloid the Weekly World News, but this latest whopper is loosely based on a real statement by a real scientist.

In his book, Regenesis, written with Ed Regis, Harvard researcher George Church really did say that it might be possible to clone Neanderthal babies using the Neanderthal genome sequence reconstructed with synthetic biology. And the kicker: A cloned embryo of our extinct cousin could be gestated by an “adventurous” woman. (On the plus side, the first volunteer would be shoe-in to get her own reality show.)

There wasn’t much reaction at first. The statement was buried pretty deep in the book, which was something of a slog to read.

But then the German magazine...