Skip to Content

Category: covering health

This week, as an exercise for my undergraduate science writing course, I gave my students this story:  Want Your Daughter To Be a Science Whiz? Soccer Might Help. The...

This week, as an exercise for my undergraduate science writing course, I gave my students this story:  Want Your Daughter To Be a Science Whiz? Soccer Might Help. The piece, which comes from NPR’s “Shots”, used a recent study to tell readers that playing soccer might make their daughters into science whizzes. But what the study showed was simply a correlation between teens’ overall daily movement (as measured by an accelerometer) and performance in standardized tests.

This correlation was apparently strongest for girls and science tests. This seemed like just the kind of result that’s been the target of a number of recent complaints by statisticians and science critics. Slice and dice your data enough...

In the pages of the Columbia Journalism Review, the medical and health-policy writer Trudy Lieberman is tossing a laurel to the legacy media--remember the legacy media?--for some nice reporting on childhood obesity.

The medium in question is a kids' magazine called...

In the pages of the Columbia Journalism Review, the medical and health-policy writer Trudy Lieberman is tossing a laurel to the legacy media--remember the legacy media?--for some nice reporting on childhood obesity.

The medium in question is a kids' magazine called ChopChop, which aims to "get kids in the kitchen." Here is Lieberman:

ChopChop is beautiful, engaging, empowers kids to cook and eat healthy foods, offers recipes even adult foodies will love, and aims to help reduce childhood obesity—the coming scourge of the health care system. For doing all this, ChopChop deserves a CJR laurel.

Whether or not one would call this journalism is an arguable point, but Lieberman is correct to observe that the magazine is sending a message to children and families, which does make it journalism of a sort. The magazine's...

The University of Southern California...

The University of Southern California has announced the staff of its newly formed California HealthCare Foundation Center for Health Reporting. That includes the editor-in-chief, the managing editor, and three senior writers.

If you're looking for the names of some of our distinguished colleagues among the new hires, look no further. They're not there. Only one of the five new hires is said to have any background in health reporting, and she seems to be more of an environmental writer than a health reporter.

Michael Parks, the former editor of the Los Angeles Times, who did the hiring, knows science writers. I don't know...