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Category: carbon sequestration

  Nobody ever said that making coal, natural gas, and petroleum into climate-friendly fuels would be easy. Andrew Revkin's Dot Earth blog today carries a link...

  Nobody ever said that making coal, natural gas, and petroleum into climate-friendly fuels would be easy. Andrew Revkin's Dot Earth blog today carries a link to a long, somewhat morose look at the money and technical issues that make the deep geological burial, or sequestration, of waste CO2 such a tough political sell. So I took a look at it, thank you Andy. It is a good and analytical piece that looks spot-on from here as far as what it does say. It is valuable reading for reporters or for anybody eager for a low-carbon economy to use as reality check. However, one does wish its perspective was broader. More on that below.

  A flawed but nonetheless impressive and detailed report just out from a substantial if techie news outlet prompts the thought: what is it about chemistry that turns off so many reporters? Why don't science journalists more often take chemistry and chemical engineering stories to a deep enough level to...

  A flawed but nonetheless impressive and detailed report just out from a substantial if techie news outlet prompts the thought: what is it about chemistry that turns off so many reporters? Why don't science journalists more often take chemistry and chemical engineering stories to a deep enough level to give readers a sense of what the atoms and molecules in today's incredible industrial complex are doing with one another? Here's the yarn:

  The topic has gotten sporadic interest over the last decade or two from large, general-interest dailies and other news agencies. It is the idea that if only we could stuff  CO2 back deep in the ground whence its...

I'm a big fan of Jim Fallows, and not just...

I'm a big fan of Jim Fallows, and not just because he once hired me, at USNews & World Report in late 1997, the last hiring he got past publisher Mort Zuckerman before the latter canned him for ostensibly not having a savvy enough sense of news (and that's a laugh). Also, not because he wrote one of the great take-downs of Beltway journalism, his "Breaking the News" book that got him hired at USNews as its editor in the first place. It's because he sees big issues with a calm, far-sighted brio.

Among his specialties is China, where he's lived and visited off and on for, like, forever. I just caught up with an article he had in the December Atlantic,...