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Category: bora zivkovic

An uproar over sexual harassment charges against one of the cofounders of the ScienceOnline meeting has so far not affected this year's attendance, one of the meeting's founders and organizers said in a telephone interview yesterday.

"We filled the registration within an hour, and we filled the...

An uproar over sexual harassment charges against one of the cofounders of the ScienceOnline meeting has so far not affected this year's attendance, one of the meeting's founders and organizers said in a telephone interview yesterday.

"We filled the registration within an hour, and we filled the remaining spots from a lottery," said Karyn Traphagen, the meeting's executive director, said. "Typically, we have 7-10 percent of attendees who cancel each year. This year, we have about 3 percent, but we have another seven weeks to go...We're moving ahead like we normally do." The meeting will be held Feb. 27-March 1 in Raleigh, N.C.

Only three of those who canceled said they were doing so because of the controversy over sexual harassment allegations leveled against Bora Zivkovic, another one of the meeting's founders and, until recently, the public face of ScienceOnline. Zivkovic...

Mariette DiChristina, the editor-in-chief of Scientific American, has provided further details on the magazine's abrupt decision on Oct. 11 to take down a blog post by Danielle Lee...

Mariette DiChristina, the editor-in-chief of Scientific American, has provided further details on the magazine's abrupt decision on Oct. 11 to take down a blog post by Danielle Lee describing an incident in which an editor--from Biology-Online.org, not Scientific American--described her as "an urban whore" when she asked to be paid for a guest post.

Saying she regrets failing to "promptly and fully communicate our intentions," DiChristina said, "we noticed a serious allegation was being made and that a person and a company were being named.  This meant we were concerned about possible libel and consequences." You can see the statement here (scroll...

In the face of multiple allegations of sexual harassment, and after admitting to harassment, Bora Zivkovic has resigned as blog editor at Scientific American, the magazine said today...

In the face of multiple allegations of sexual harassment, and after admitting to harassment, Bora Zivkovic has resigned as blog editor at Scientific American, the magazine said today in a statement.

"Following recent events, Bora Zivkovic has offered his resignation from Scientific American, and Scientific American has decided to accept that resignation," the statement said.

It made reference to a year-old incident in which Zivkovic was accused of and admitted to harassment, but which was not disclosed until this week. "When Monica Byrne contacted Scientific American a year ago, we investigated her report, offered the Company's apologies and Ms. Byrne acknowledged in her blog that she was...

Bora Zivkovic, who has admitted to sexual harassment and resigned from the board of ScienceOnline, has now taken a break from his duties as blog editor at Scientific American, according to...

Bora Zivkovic, who has admitted to sexual harassment and resigned from the board of ScienceOnline, has now taken a break from his duties as blog editor at Scientific American, according to Philip Yam, Scientific American's online managing editor.

In an email this morning, Yam confirmed the news that was making its way around Twitter--that Zivkovic was taking a break from his duties at his request.

Alice Henchley, a spokesperson for Scientific American, said in an email, "Bora Zivkovic is on personal leave at the moment."

-Paul Raeburn

[Update 3:55pm: ScienceOnline releases statement from co-founder Anton Zuiker saying Bora Zivkovic has "voluntarily resigned" from the organization's board of directors and that "the board is reviewing Bora's future role in the organization." See details below.]

[...

[Update 3:55pm: ScienceOnline releases statement from co-founder Anton Zuiker saying Bora Zivkovic has "voluntarily resigned" from the organization's board of directors and that "the board is reviewing Bora's future role in the organization." See details below.]

[Update 3:39pm: I just became aware of a post on Medium in which Hannah Waters, a Scientific American blogger, wrote that even if Monica Byrne hadn't named Zivkovic, Waters "would have recognized him from his behavior because I have gone through it too." She wrote that he "began flirting a little," would "occasionally tell me that he loved me," and joked "that I was his 'concubine.'" She titled her post "The Insidious Power of Not-Quite-Harassment."]

A little more than a year ago, on Oct. 9, 2012...

This week, the journal BioScience made available an upcoming paper with the rather unassuming title "Journalism and Social Media as Means of Observing the Contexts of Science".  On first glance, you might...

This week, the journal BioScience made available an upcoming paper with the rather unassuming title "Journalism and Social Media as Means of Observing the Contexts of Science".  On first glance, you might think this an unlikely study to generate an angry response.

You have to read a little farther to get to the explosive potential. The paper, published by communications researchers in Germany and the United States, results from a survey of neuroscientists in both countries who were asked to weight the relative value and influence of traditional news outlets versus blogs. Or as the researchers put it in the abstract, to assess "the influence of various types of 'old' and 'new" media on public opinion and political decision making.

Based on the response of some 250 scientists (fairly evenly divided between the countries), the researchers found...

In December 2006, the pioneering science blogger, Bora Zivkovic, met with his colleague, Anton Zuiker, to work on plans for the first Triangle Science Blogging Conference. They decided to try putting together an anthology of the year's...

In December 2006, the pioneering science blogger, Bora Zivkovic, met with his colleague, Anton Zuiker, to work on plans for the first Triangle Science Blogging Conference. They decided to try putting together an anthology of the year's best science blog posts and ask their conference sponsor, Lulu.com., to publish it as a handout for conference attendees.

Fast forward to this year:  Zivkovic is the science blog editor for Scientific American and the conference has become one of the hottest tickets in science communication (Science OnLine 2013 begins January 30 in Raleigh, N.C.). And what began as The Open Laboratory 2006 has evolved into the first of a series of high-caliber trade books titled The Best Science Writing Online 2012, ...

Last year, when I (@praeburn) came home from ScienceOnline2011 (#scio11), I told my wife, Elizabeth (@devitaraeburn) that it was the most exciting meeting I thought I'd ever attended. "The energy was incredible," I told her. "I got so many ideas. And I met all...

Last year, when I (@praeburn) came home from ScienceOnline2011 (#scio11), I told my wife, Elizabeth (@devitaraeburn) that it was the most exciting meeting I thought I'd ever attended. "The energy was incredible," I told her. "I got so many ideas. And I met all kinds of people whom I knew only from Twitter." I mentioned some and pointed her to their blogs. "You have to follow these people!" I said.

Many of them, I told her, were so excited about their writing that they were doing it for nothing other than the sheer joy of putting words to pixels. How they fed, clothed, and sheltered themselves was an obvious question, but few seemed to be starving, at least while the conference food was available; most were dressed, as far as I recall; and most seemed to have found a way to snag a room at the hotel. (I didn't see anything like an Occupy ScienceOnline tent city outside the hotel.) The 250 slots at last year's conference filled...

Looking for good science writing online? You couldn't find a better field guide than The Open Laboratory 2012, a collection some of the best writing on science blogs in 2011.

...

Looking for good science writing online? You couldn't find a better field guide than The Open Laboratory 2012, a collection some of the best writing on science blogs in 2011.

This is the sixth collection in which Bora Zivkovic, Scientific American's blog editor, and various co-conspirators have reviewed science-blog posts to come up with some of the best of the lot. Jennifer Ouellette was the editor this year, along with Bora. Together they read and re-read 720 entries. Amanda Moon, of Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, decided the...