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Category: bird flu

In On Science Blogs this week, Tabitha M. Powledge goes viral, wrapping up comments and insights into the H7N9 virus, the new SARS-like coronavirus, the seasonal flu in the U.S., and even a bit about why these viruses cause such alarm.

She points to...

In On Science Blogs this week, Tabitha M. Powledge goes viral, wrapping up comments and insights into the H7N9 virus, the new SARS-like coronavirus, the seasonal flu in the U.S., and even a bit about why these viruses cause such alarm.

She points to a useful guide on how to read the news about these bugs, posted by Maryn McKenna at her Wired magazine blog, Superbug

If all of that is too much for you, she also sends you to a post with instructions for making a model of DNA out of licorice whips and jelly babies--and if you don't know what they are, you haven't been watching Dr. Who.

-Paul Raeburn

Links--too numerous to describe in detail, but too good to pass up:

--Nicola Jones had a short update April 2 in Nature on the muzzling of Canadian government...

Links--too numerous to describe in detail, but too good to pass up:

--Nicola Jones had a short update April 2 in Nature on the muzzling of Canadian government scientists in seven federal agencies, which has drawn protests from Canadian science writers, among others. Jones reports that Canada's information commissioner has launched an investigation into the practice. Roxanne Palmer of International Business Times asks, in a longer story, which country is more open with regard to scientific research: Canada, the U.S., or China? The Tracker's carefully considered point of view...

In this week's edition of On Science BlogsTabitha M. Powledge pursues the notorious case of the dead ferrets, a mystery worthy of 221B Baker St. 

She begins with a nice...

In this week's edition of On Science BlogsTabitha M. Powledge pursues the notorious case of the dead ferrets, a mystery worthy of 221B Baker St. 

She begins with a nice roundup of blogs addressing the announced resumption this week of research on H5N1 bird-flu viruses engineered to be transmissible between mammals. Until now, humans appear to have contracted the virus only through contact with birds, especially poultry. But it can't be passed from one human to another. The new research was aimed at making the virus transmissible among ferrets, which respond to the virus the way humans do--or close to it, as I discussed in a post here earlier this week. The researchers doing the work agreed to a moratorium a year ago and unilaterally ended it this...

This morning, Mom Kunthear and Justine Drennan of The Phnom Penh Post report that a new case of avian flu has been found in a two-year-old girl...

This morning, Mom Kunthear and Justine Drennan of The Phnom Penh Post report that a new case of avian flu has been found in a two-year-old girl, the fourth case of the disease in Cambodia since Jan. 1. 

The World Health Organization reports that as of Jan. 16, 610 confirmed cases of H5N1 virus infections have been reported to WHO from 15 countries. Of those infected, 360 died.

The virus generally spreads from chickens to humans, and that is believed to be what is happening in Cambodia and elsewhere. But public-health authorities worry about mutations that could make the virus transmissible from one human to another. To try to understand that risk, some labs had engineered the virus...

At NPR...

At NPR Nell Greenfieldboyce shows how the same pile of reporting can be dramatically different in presentation depending whether done by a radio reporter, or print reporter, and get pretty much the same place. In this case the radio and print reporter are one and the same. Greenfieldboyce spent years writing the news before joining NPR to read it out loud five or six years ago. Now she does both.

It is not easy to edit tape and compose a voice over and intro for broadcast, and also to write a standard news story that is not merely a lightly massaged transcript. That however is...

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A Dutch team's efforts to get ready for any H5N1 bird flu pandemic - by making a potentially human-virulent strain via genetic engineering to study its behavior in lab animals - has gotten  intermittent examination in news reports. Among the first reports, and perhaps the very first, in the latest news crop was an ...